Natural stone also varies by type of material, with granite and slate being much harder than marble or limestone. You also want to make sure the space being cleaned is well ventilated, and follow all manufacturers instructions in the application of any cleanser.

Porcelain tiles are made from ultra-fine porcelain clays fired at extremely high temperatures. By far the most popular faux-stone porcelain tiles are ones that mimic marble, which makes sense because marble is the most popular natural stone. Porcelain tiles are typically installed using standard gray thinset, while natural stone may require a specially formulated thinset.

Because a porcelain tile has four factory edges, when you cut a tile, you trim off the factory edge, and the cut edge is placed against a wall or other surface where it is concealed by baseboard or other trim. A hard or sharp object dropped on a glazed tile, can chip the glazing, exposing the porcelain core.

This gives the material a very strong structure, making it sound against cracks and breaks. This layer can be printed to look like nearly anything, including a variety of natural materials.

All natural stone materials also have to be sealed, although harder options such as granite and slate can sometimes weather fine after only an initial application. Most natural-stone tile lines also include accent pieces carved from stone, such as bull-nose edging, chair rail, medallions and rope moldings.

Porcelain tiles are produced to exacting standards in controlled manufacturing plants, ensuring quality, consistency and uniform sizing, while virtually eliminating defects.

Green marble tiles should never be set with mortar that contains high amounts of lime because it can cause the marble to cup and warp.

Using a wet saw for every cut when setting natural stone means it typically takes longer to install stone tile than it does to set porcelain tile, an important distinction when estimating the cost of a tile job. Porcelain tiles donÂ’t require sealing because the glazed surface is impervious to staining. Since natural stone is porous and susceptible to staining, you should protect it with a penetrating sealer.



Source: www.proconstructionguide.com/floor-tile-debate-stone-vs-porcelain/
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Natural stone also varies by type of material, with granite and slate being much harder than marble or limestone. You also want to make sure the space being cleaned is well ventilated, and follow all manufacturers instructions in the application of any cleanser.Porcelain tiles are made from...