We had a drainage problem on one side of the house that resulted in wet walls (interior, not exterior) as well as major efflorescence in the new tile installation. Unfortunately, the slab was not leveled properly, which led to a number of dead spots and possibly buckling.

Regarding adhesives, you need to have appropriate moisture testing of the concrete to know what needs to be done to remedy the problem. WeÂ’re trying to figure out if thereÂ’s a way to dry the slab without having to rip out all of the tile. In fact, you can do it yourself since vinyl tile is one of the easiest flooring options to install.

One of the ways to outsmart this problem is to create a “vapor” barrier on the surface of the slab. After reading the posts above, it seems the tile installer should have put down an epoxy resin before setting the tile.

I still need an additional underlayment between the slab and wood in addition the glue (my contractor says no)?

I would start there and then based on the moisture testing results, you can shop for appropriate products to go on top of the slab. I notice that a few still have that grey color, do you think that will dry out under the tile over time?

Luxury vinyl tile marble floors are moisture and stain-resistant, and theyÂ’re warmer underfoot than cold, hard stone.


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We had a drainage problem on one side of the house that resulted in wet walls (interior, not exterior) as well as major efflorescence in the new tile installation. Unfortunately, the slab was not leveled properly, which led to a number of dead spots and possibly buckling.Regarding...