Add an ounce of 3 percent hydrogen peroxide to a 1/2 cup of water and stir in a teaspoon of a mild detergent. For oil based stains: mix 1/2 cup of baking soda, a small amount of liquid dishwashing detergent, and warm water together until it forms a thick paste. For ink, crayons, or nail polish: use a cotton ball dipped in acetone (nail polish remover) and rub over the stain. To do this you must wipe down the walls and surfaces in your bathroom after use with a towel. Because marble stains easily the best way to prevent this is to wipe up spills quickly so they donÂ’t have a chance to penetrate the stone. Do not let anything acidic, such as lemons or vinegar spills sit on your marble for more than a few minutes or it can eat away at the stone. It may not look as perfect as it would if that finish was applied by someone with experience, but it should still look good. Allow that to stand overnight and see if the nail polish is soft enough to scrape off the next day with a soft tool, such as the plastic putty knife suggested or a sharpened wooden paint mixing stick. If you look online, you’ll find plenty of suggestions for getting nail varnish off of things on which you’d rather not have nail varnish. Devs aren’t so friendly with carpeting and upholstery, so stick with them when you’re dealing with stains on clothes and bathmats and such. To get all the residual solvent out, go over the areas where you’ve used it with a clean, wet rag—again, white- or light-colored is the way to go. More good news: denture tablets are pretty cheap and actually go on and buy generic brand ones, they’re all the same stuff. You can remove this discoloration with a gentle bleach made with household cleaning products. Dampen a rag with acetone and dab it on the stain to remove whatever material is on the surface of the marble. Dampen a rag with acetone and dab it on the stain to remove whatever material is on the surface of the marble. Gather your supplies, which will include a soft sponge, cloth or mop, and a nonabrasive mild cleanser such as liquid dishwashing detergent. For plant based stains: use the same method as above, but instead of using liquid dishwashing detergent use hydrogen peroxide. However, they do caution that using ammonia frequently will dull the finish of the marble so do this only when it is really needed. Marble scratches easily, so dust it often with a untreated dust mop for floors or a soft cloth for countertops to keep the small particles in the dust from scratching it. Make sure you blot the spill, not rub it or it will only spread it to more surface of the marble. Immerse the cleaning cloth in warm water and use it to gently and carefully remove the hardened paste from the marble. You may need to mechanically remove the nail polish will a dull flat instrument like a plastic putty knife to safely remove the nail polish. They’re willful little bottles of evil dressed up in bright colors, like those revolting wax soda candy things — or at least that’s what my inbox would lead you to believe. Fortunately, today we’re going to go through a few different kinds of surfaces and the cleaning products they’ll respond to. I mean you’ve already tossed nail polish all over the place — what more harm could it do? You don’t want to saturate the fabric, but there does need to be enough water to remove the solvent.
Source: www.quora.com/How-do-you-remove-stains-from-marble-tilesgenaMarble
Add an ounce of 3 percent hydrogen peroxide to a 1/2 cup of water and stir in a teaspoon of a mild detergent. For oil based stains: mix 1/2 cup of baking soda, a small amount of liquid dishwashing detergent, and warm water together until it forms a thick paste....