To attach the plywood to the frame of the cabinets with screws, first drill a pilot hole to keep from splitting the hardwood face frame. If you need to scribe a slab to fit, apply duct tape to the base of the saw to protect the granite. Before you lay the granite slabs back on top, lay down some cardboard to protect the sink overnight.

Apply second bead on top of sink rim to waterproof the gap between the sink and the countertop. In addition to the main countertop surface, you’ll need to decide on the length of the countertop overhang, as well as the type and size of backsplash.



Scribe the template so that it fits snugly against the wall along the entire run of cabinets before tracing the front edge onto the template. And allow no more than 6 inches of unsupported overhang with 2-centimeter stone and 9 inches with 3-centimeter stone. Also, insist that your fabricator “rod” the cutouts with steel or fiberglass reinforcements to strengthen the narrow areas around the cutouts. Unless they’re being delivered, you’ll have to pick up the countertops from the fabricator when they’re ready. When the slabs arrive, have a cleared space ready in the kitchen area to store them upright on edge until you’re ready to install them. If the wall-facing edge of a countertop isn’t flush and requires adjustment, carefully mark all the areas of the countertop to be removed and gently lower it back down. Join the butt seams using color-matched two-part epoxy, which you can purchase from the fabricator shop. Don’t use silicone caulk; over time, silicone caulk could wick into the stone and cause staining.

It can be installed over any other tightly bonded flooring, making it ideal for retrofits. Also, plan on eating sandwiches or take-out during the process, since your kitchen will be down for several days. If you have a dishwasher opening, cut thinner 1×3 pine to length and screw it to the studs to make sure you’ve got plenty of room for the backside of the dishwasher.

Lay several beads of construction adhesive between the plywood sheets for a permanent bond. Embed the cement board into the mortar and screw it to the plywood with cement board screws. The mortar will fill any voids between the surfaces and bond them into a monolithic surface. If you have an inside corner like ours, start your pattern there so you’ll be sure it will track symmetrically from this point in both directions. To support the backside of the returns, cut some upright supports and place them against the walls. Once you’ve got the pieces cut, butter the backside of your pieces with mortar and stick them to the front edge. Because gravity works 24 hours a day, you’ll probably need spacers to keep the tile from sliding.

Work it in from several directions and squeegee the excess off with the edge of the grout float.

Apply the sealer liberally to the surface, let it be absorbed and then wipe away the excess with a clean, lint-free cloth.

Setting kitchen tile is a project that’s definitely within reach of the average do-it-yourselfer.

Be sure you have a nice, even front edge; a small gap in the back against the wall won’t matter.

The secret to a solid foundation for tile is to bond the cement board to the plywood below. Again mix a small batch of thin-set mortar, spread it over the plywood edge and push the cement board into the edge. Mix some latex-fortified thin-set mortar in a plastic pail to a smooth, mashed potato consistency. It’s a lot tougher once the mortar dries hard as concrete, so a bit of attention now will ensure you won’t see ugly mortar patches on your nicely grouted surface later.

If you end up with a small piece in the inside corner, you’ll need to cut a few inches off the outside corner piece to avoid the “tiny tile” look. When you’ve finished laying the edge pieces, look down the edge from end to end and straighten them if necessary. Because gravity works 24 hours a day, you’ll probably need spacers to keep the tile from sliding.

Once the mortar has set overnight, pick up sealer at the tile shop (ask for the right stuff for your tile). The grout here will most likely crack after a few weeks, so it’s best to get a color-match caulk and fill the gap the day after grouting.

You may not need them on the cabinet end where the manufacturer has installed a finished end. For most stainless steel sinks, it’s safe to flip the sink over and trace around it and then make another line 1/2 in. Scribe to each wall, adjusting your scribing tool each time for the largest gap on that wall. This is more than enough in most cases, so don’t panic if your adjoining wall looks out of whack. Be sure the cutout is supported when you reach the end of your cut so you don’t break an edge. A sharp handsaw will give you a nice, slow, controlled cut and time to react if the cut is straying from your mark. Then position the end cap even with the bottom edge of the build-up filler strip and press it firmly into place. Once the adhesive is dry to the touch, press the laminate piece in place and file the edge for a clean, precise fit.

Professional installers vary greatly in their methods of fastening countertops to base cabinets. We’ll walk you through everything you need to know to improve the look and feel of your kitchen with new countertops. In this article, we’ll show you how to measure, buy and install your own countertops. Make a sketch and then, starting from the back walls, measure the exact lengths from the walls to the edge of each run of cabinets. For most stainless steel sinks, it’s safe to flip the sink over and trace around it and then make another line 1/2 in. You can start with any section of countertop, but it’s best to begin with the longest corner section because the other sections often join or relate to this piece. Be sure the cutout is supported when you reach the end of your cut so you don’t break an edge. Apply contact cement to each mating surface and let it dry to the touch (about 20 minutes).

Be sure to note how much you want your countertop to overhang the face frames of the cabinets, typically 1″ to 1 1/2″. Your walls may not be perfectly square, so it’s a great idea to create a template for the granite countertops.

Use a spade bit to make a pilot hole in the plywood, and use a jigsaw to cut the sink hole.

Use 1-1/4″ screws to adjust the height of the slab from underneath to raise and lower the countertop.

Next, to fill in the seams you’ll start with a dollop of polyester-based resin and add a small amount of color, trying to match the color of the granite.

Once you’ve got your granite picked out and your old countertops removed, take accurate measurements of your base cabinets to give to the fabricator. In your template, you must measure the exact locations of cutouts for sinks and cooktops, and holes for faucets and soap dispensers.

If you plan an undermount sink, make note of that on the template for the fabricator, who will be able to cut a groove along the underside edge of the sink hole, so that the sink clips can be secured. It’s important to always carry the countertops in a vertical position, never horizontally flat, to avoid cracking or breaking the stone.

It’s important to always carry the countertops in a vertical position, never horizontally flat, to avoid cracking or breaking the stone.

When lifting the countertop, take extra care to support the granite where it is thin, such as along cutouts.

Then fit the slabs back in place making sure all the edges fit snuggly and securely, including the seams between slabs if you have more than one.

With the slabs flush and level on the cabinets, if you have multiple slabs, now is the time to fit them together. Installing a granite countertop yourself is challenging, but the cost-savings and enhancement to your kitchen are well worth the effort. Follow these step-by-step instructions for hanging wallpaper on a flat wall and around windows and doors.

Transfer the measurements to the plywood and cut it with a circular saw and a straightedge guide for a clean, even cut. Be sure you have a nice, even front edge; a small gap in the back against the wall won’t matter. If you don’t have access to a stapler, use 1-in. The secret to a solid foundation for tile is to bond the cement board to the plywood below. Once the top surface is covered, cut cement board strips to cover the exposed plywood edge.

It’s a lot tougher once the mortar dries hard as concrete, so a bit of attention now will ensure you won’t see ugly mortar patches on your nicely grouted surface later. First set them in place and then mark the locations of the rest of the pieces by placing them end to end. When you’ve finished laying the edge pieces, look down the edge from end to end and straighten them if necessary.

When you get to an electrical receptacle, mark the piece in place and cut it on your wet saw. The grout here will most likely crack after a few weeks, so it’s best to get a color-match caulk and fill the gap the day after grouting. You can choose any tile, any color and any size, but if all the choices seem daunting, do what we did. Transfer the measurements to the plywood and cut it with a circular saw and a straightedge guide for a clean, even cut. If you don’t have access to a stapler, use 1-in. The mortar will fill any voids between the surfaces and bond them into a monolithic surface.

If you have an inside corner like ours, start your pattern there so you’ll be sure it will track symmetrically from this point in both directions.

Once you’re finished with one section, take a close look at the tile, check the spacing and look for any crooked tiles or extra-wide or narrow grout lines.

To support the backside of the returns, cut some upright supports and place them against the walls.

Once you’ve got the pieces cut, butter the backside of your pieces with mortar and stick them to the front edge.

Mix some mortar and trowel it onto the wall just high enough for the first two rows on one section. When you get to an electrical receptacle, mark the piece in place and cut it on your wet saw. Mix your grout to a toothpaste consistency according to the manufacturer’s guidelines.

When applied to particleboard or plywood underlayment by a production shop, this proven product is ideal for kitchens, bathrooms and other settings.

But if you have only one inside corner as we did, the project is well within the skill level of the average do-it-yourselfer. If you’re installing a cast iron enameled sink, you should make an even smaller cutout, leaving more countertop to support the weight of the sink. Sand only to your scribe line, keeping the belt sander at 90 degrees or more to the top of the backsplash as shown. It should fit on the first try, but you may need to do some additional sanding for a tight fit. Next, glue (use carpenter’s glue) and clamp a buildup strip onto the underside of the top and flush with the edge.

It lets you easily see your pencil mark and it reduces chipping of the laminate as you cut. When the edge is almost flush, slightly bevel the end cap to remove sharp corners that could snag a dishcloth later. For a tight fit, screw the angles to the cabinet first and then draw the top down to meet the steel angle with the second screw. I like to place them a hair lower than the top of the cabinet (or build-up) and then draw the top down tight with a screw into the underside of the countertop.

Plastic laminate countertops have been adorning kitchen cabinets for more than 50 years—and with good reason. But if you have only one inside corner as we did, the project is well within the skill level of the average do-it-yourselfer. Just keep in mind you’ll need to do a bit of filing in either case to shape the end caps.

If you’re installing a cast iron enameled sink, you should make an even smaller cutout, leaving more countertop to support the weight of the sink. This is more than enough in most cases, so don’t panic if your adjoining wall looks out of whack. Next, glue (use carpenter’s glue) and clamp a buildup strip onto the underside of the top and flush with the edge.

Professional installers vary greatly in their methods of fastening countertops to base cabinets.

Source: www.proconstructionguide.com/7-steps-to-install-marble-kitchen-countertops/

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To attach the plywood to the frame of the cabinets with screws, first drill a pilot hole to keep from splitting the hardwood face frame. If you need to scribe a slab to fit, apply duct tape to the base of the saw to protect the granite. Before you...