Sealer keeps spilled substances on the surface of the stone giving you more time to clean it up, so that it is not absorbed into the pores of the stone causing a stain. Also, the barrier is just below the surface, so even if deep stains are prevented staining can still occur at the surface level with prolonged exposure. So it is a good idea to lemon-juice test the stone, to determine if it is suitable for the intended use. The reaction, called “etching,” corrodes the surface, destroying the polish and leaving a dull spot on your countertop. Porous stones will still be more susceptible to surface stains and will require sealing more often (generally every 1-3 years). There is certainly a bit of hysteria regarding granite countertop sealers, and the need for sealing granite is generally overblown. Grocery stores claim to be green by offering tote bags rather than plastic, but you don’t see people calling them liars. If you get pits again, then just fill them using this repair kit for pitting and chipping in granite, marble, quartz. Keep applying additional coats of sealer until you don’t see any more improvement (increase) in absorption time.

When left on the surface long enough, it is absorbed into the pores of the stone, hence the term impregnator. Excess sealer is wiped off the surface and the water or solvent base evaporates leaving the resin to dry and harden creating the barrier. Some readily absorb virtually anything spilled on them while others are so dense that essentially nothing is absorbed or it takes so long the stone is virtually stain-proof. Highly porous/absorbent stones need to be sealed and periodically re-sealed to adequately control absorbency and the tendency to stain. This problem occurs with calcite-bases stones like marble, travertine, limestone and potentially even with some granite that has calcite in it. Even when sealed, the absorbency rate and tendency to stain remains more a function or characteristic of the particular stone than the sealer. Also note that general guidelines of every 1-3 years or 4-6 years are meant only to give you an idea.
While it may save you the trouble of re-sealing, you’d have to re-seal 3 to 10 times (depending on the sealer you use) before granite shield would save you money.

The old stone had developed many pits and pocks and chips around the sink area and was rough to the touch. Sealing it will help prevent this, but some white granites can be so porous that even when sealed water and other liquids may absorb in 15 minutes or less.







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Source: www.mcmstone.com/granite-countertop-sealer-works/
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Sealer keeps spilled substances on the surface of the stone giving you more time to clean it up, so that it is not absorbed into the pores of the stone causing a stain. Also, the barrier is just below the surface, so even if deep stains are...