One preferentially used one to texture work as it had a rough surface. He does have an “interesting” method with hammering over his tong hand but the actual setup is a really good demo of how simple it can get.





I have a small block of granite used in the past for warming the feets.

What a treat it would be to see a museum with some tools in it from this era. There are good anvils and bad anvils, simple anvils, or ones with lots of bells and whistles.

But in the end, they all come down to a chunk of metal upon which to hit other chunks of metal, with a chunk of metal.Some of these improvised anvils are kind of terrible, while some of them are in my opinion, comparable to real anvils.

Well, rest assured that, in my not so humble opinion, the horn standard on most anvils is grossly overrated. I got at harbor freight about 18 months ago. You may note that the heel and two of the feet are completely broken off, the horn had to be extended because it was a useless piece of crap, and the face looks like it’s been in use for a hundred years rather than one. To make it, first cut out the grip part of the handle. Disadvantages, they’re very light in bouncy, and kind of tricky to secure.


Blacksmith Anvil Made Of Granite Rock. Part 1. Custom Homemade Diy


See my Part-1 video about the rock anvil at… www.youtube.com/my_videos_edit?ns=1&video_id=4… This is a …

Advantages, they are very solid, and are usually very reasonably priced, and you get 2 of em’. I like ’em just because the materials are easy to get a hold of, and its easy to put ’em together once you’ve got ’em. The one in that picture is a piece of 1′ mild steel, with a 1/4′ piece of stainless welded on as the face, and a cute little horn and hardie hole welded on. To secure it, you can weld on some spike-legs, or just nail it down with some railroad spikes, if welding’s not an option. In layman’s terms, you find a chunk of steel, and you use it as an anvil. It will at worst crackle bit if you use a porous stone that was recently rained on. Folks back in the olden days forged iron blooms on granite slabs, as back then a good anvil was almost as expensive as it is today, and they made some pretty cool stuff on those rocks.

I would advise against using a sledge hammer as an anvil. I believe the best tools you use can be tools you make. The largest may have been up around 50 pounds, certainly no more than 100. As long as you didn’t work the metal at black, or bounce the hammer off the face, it seemed to hold up just fine. I would strongly suggest safety goggles if you’re experimenting with a stone anvil, since the chipping could be rather spectacular. Bronze age anvils were mostly stone but it would seem that bronze would work, developing a very hard surface from work hardening. Granite would have made the best stone anvil. It has been postulated by historians that the earliest anvil was meteoric iron. However, rare metoric iron would have been much too valuable to use when a common piece of granite would do. The first iron anvils would come with the iron age. For centuries anvils were made of wrought iron with a thin layer of steel welded to the face. As steel became more common these plates became thicker but were often a cause of failure. Not until the 1800’s did crucible steel become common enough to use a plate thick enough to be reliable. Today most good quality anvils are made of cast steel the type dependent on the manufacturer. There are also a large number of cast iron “shop anvils” sold. Cast iron anvils are worthless for forging as they are dead (no rebound) and very brittle. I have no idea how good it would be for an anvil, but they are wonderful for when you need a super-flat or super-hard surface.


The Granite Anvil 2017





The point being made by the teacher was that you don’t really need much more than some charcoal, a piece of rock and a cheap hammer to do some respectable work. I seem to recall they were used also in japan in early times.

You really would want a dressed edge to work to. Also a good accurate flat surface is the slate from an old pool table, one of which was left in our basement when we bought the house. It makes great workbench surfaces, very flat, no glare or reflection, very heavy and stable.


Blacksmiths Anvil Homemade With Granite Rock Using An Angle Grinder (Part )


To see the anvil in action, go to this video… www.youtube.com/watch?v=pia8fN8FPs0 This is more details of my home made …





genaGranite
One preferentially used one to texture work as it had a rough surface. He does have an 'interesting' method with hammering over his tong hand but the actual setup is a really good demo of how simple it can get. I have a small block of granite used in the...