We had to apply it, then flame it in with a torch, then cut off the excess with a razor and then buff with fine steel wool. Granite is largely made up of quartz grains formed under high heat and pressure, when they cool the contract about half their volume and leave pores and minute cracks. Almost any surface including manmade synthetics will stain, but granite isn’t one of them, it’s that simple. Most granite will need two applications to properly seal, while more porous counters will need three or more. The sealer will protect your countertops for several years, but a sealant test should be conducted every few years to determine if new sealant needs to be applied. Rather than allowing the spills to soak into the stone or grout, the sealer forms a barrier to keep the liquid out.



If it helps to prevent staining long enough for me to wipe things up it would be worth it. It sounds like you had honest installers that didn’t try to sell you the snake oil of trying to seal something that is impervious to staining in the first place.

The guy will die of radon exposure from the granite, long before he’ll ever permanently stain it. You have spent a lot of money on installing the best countertops; now make the same investment in protecting them. Each pint will cover 25 to 50 square feet on porous surfaces or 100 to 150 square feet on denser surfaces.

The only drawback to this product is that you should use a regular sealer before using this product for best results.

Even better is how easy it is to use, simply spray it on, allow to sit for about 3 minutes and then wipe off any excess with a dry towel.









Source: www.countertopspecialty.com/which-granite-sealer-to-use.html
genaGranite
We had to apply it, then flame it in with a torch, then cut off the excess with a razor and then buff with fine steel wool. Granite is largely made up of quartz grains formed under high heat and pressure, when they cool the contract about...